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Astronomers Discover Binary Star in the NGC 2632 "Beehive" Cluster

Astronomers Discover Binary Star in the NGC 2632 "Beehive" Cluster

Astronomers have detected a new low-mass eclipsing binary star in an open cluster named NGC 2632, better known as the Beehive Cluster (or Praesepe). The newly identified binary, designated PTFEB132.707+19.810, contains two late-type stars much smaller and less massive than the sun. The new findings were detailed June 28 in a paper published on arXiv.org.

NGC 2632 is an open star cluster that looks like a hive of bees in the constellation Cancer. Located some 577 light years away, it is one of the nearest open clusters to the solar system. Due to its proximity, this cluster is the target of numerous observations conducted by astronomers searching for new objects, including eclipsing binaries. Such binaries could be very helpful in improving our known theoretical stellar evolution models.

Recently, a team of astronomers led by Adam Kraus of the University of Texas at Austin, has detected a new eclipsing binary in the Beehive Cluster. Although PTFEB132.707+19.810 was identified in 2002, its true nature remained unclear until the research conducted by Kraus' team. The new study confirms that this star is a low-mass eclipsing binary. Read the full article on Phys.Org >>

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